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Infertility

Fertility technology, particularly non-IVF treatments, has resulted in a marked increase in multiple births, having significant health implications for both mothers and babies.

Infertility

The safety of fertility drugs has been a concern to physicians and patients alike. A new study assessing fertility drugs and breast cancer risk has reassuring results.

Patients undergoing IVF do better with strong social support, but many of these patients feel isolated and don’t share their fertility struggles. Can mindfulness help?

Clinically meaningful data about stress and fertility has been reported by Longitudinal Investigation of Fertility and the Environment (LIFE) study researchers.

New research expected this year will bring about significant changes to clinical practice. Here, society leaders share what’s on their radar for 2014.

What research from the past year will have the most significant impact on women's health care? The leaders of five major ob/gyn societies weigh in.

A head-to-head comparison of salpingotomy and salpingectomy finds that removing the affected tube after an ectopic pregnancy doesn’t affect fertility as expected.

Physicians’ groups are urging ob/gyns to have difficult conversations with obese women about their weight. Here’s one example of how utter bluntness can be an effective tactic.

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